Author Archives: Scotia

Scotia is one of the Owners of A Muse N Games

2017-2018 Star Wars Destiny Regional Championship

by November 15, 2017

A Muse N Games is pleased to announce that we have been selected as the host of the 2017-2018 Star Wars Destiny Regional Championship on March 24, 2018.

The event will be capped at 64 players.

Registration is now open in store and online here. Registration is $25 including taxes.

Prizing

4-19 FFG Regional prize kit only (details not yet announced)
20-64 $15 store credit per additional player will be added to the prize pool

Itinerary

The first round will begin at noon, player meeting will be at 11:45am, the store will open at 11am for on site check in. There will be 15 minutes planned in between rounds in case of running over time.
The Event should take approximately 8 hours but if we get close to the full 64 entrants it will add an additional 2 hours to the tournament. Depending on the number of players a longer dinner break may occur before the cut.

Rounds will be as follows:
Swiss Rounds: 35 minutes each
Single Elimination, Best-of-Three Rounds (except Final): 90 minutes each
Final Single Elimination, Best-of-Three Round: 120 minutes

Number of Registered Players will determine the Number of Swiss Rounds followed by a Top Cut.
9-12 players 4 rounds Top 4
13-24 players 5 rounds Top 4
25-40 players 6 rounds Top 8
41-76 players 7 rounds Top 8

2017-2018 X-Wing Regional Championship

by November 15, 2017

Star Wars: X-Wing

A Muse N Games will be hosting the 2017-2018 X-Wing Regional on March 10, 2018 at the Viscount Gort Hotel.

Registration for the event is $25 and is now available in store or online here.

Viscount Gort Hotel Banquet & Conference Center

The event will be capped at 64 players.

Early Bird Registration Draw
Those who register by 23:59 December 31, 2017 will be entered in a draw for a Tie Fighter Dice Bag which has an Alt Art R2-D2/Integrated Astromech and an Alt Art Push the Limit in it.

Bonus the first 10 registrants* will receive an Alt Art Hera Syndoula and an Alt Art Soontir Fel! 
*Offer only for first 10 people to register before 23:59 December 31, 2017

Prizing

4-41 – Fantasy Flight Regional Kit for Prizing (yet to be announced)
42-64 – $15 store credit per additional player will be added to the prize pool

Itinerary

09:00 On-Site check-in begins.
09:45 Player meeting
09:50 First round pairings announced
10:00 First round begins.
11:30 Second round begins.

Rounds are 75 minutes each, there will be a 15 minute window after each round while the next round is prepared.

There will be a 45 minute dinner break between the end of swiss, and the beginning of the top cut.

2017-2018 Armada Regional Championship

by November 15, 2017

A Muse N Games will be hosting the 2017-2018 Armada Regional Championship on March 3, 2018.
The event will be capped at 16 players.
Players can register in store or online here. Registration is $35 including tax.
BONUS****Players who register before 23:59 Dec 31, 2017 will receive an Alt Art GR-75 Medium Transports and an Alt Art Raider I-Class Corvette!****

Prizing

4-8 players Fantasy Flight Regional Prize Kit (details to be announced)

9-16 players we will add $20 in store credit per additional player

Itinerary

First round will begin at Noon, player meeting will be at 11:45am. The Store will open at 11am and you can check in anytime between 11am and 11:45am.
The tournament will consist of 3 Swiss Rounds of 135 minutes each with 15 minutes between each round and a cut to Top 2. The Final Round will be 180 minutes.

2017-2018 Fantasy Flight Games Regionals – Star Wars Track

by November 15, 2017

A Muse N Games is pleased to announce that we have been selected as the host for the following Star Wars Fantasy Flight Games Regional Championships:



Mar 3 2018: Armada Regional

 



Star Wars: X-Wing
Mar 10 2018: X-Wing Regional


 Mar 24 2018: Star Wars Destiny Regional


Click any of the above links for more information on the tournaments including prizes, itinerary, and registration.

Viscount Gort Hotel Banquet & Conference Center

A Muse N Games has partnered with the Viscount Gort Hotel as a sponsor of the 2017 Regional Championships. We will be hosting the X-Wing regional championship at the Viscount Gort

Modern Masters 2017 League

by March 29, 2017

Leauge starts April 2 at 2pm (Ends April 16 at 6pm)

To tnter the league, a player gets 3 packs of Modern Masters 2017 for $35.

  • Players will open three booster packs and use those boosters to build a 30-card deck.
  • The league will last three weeks. (Players may enter the league at any point during the league)
  • Every week, players will add a booster pack to their pool, rebuilding as often as players would like. Players can also add a booster after three losses. (MM17 boosters are 20% off for league members for league purchases = $12)
  • Matches consist of a single game. Each player gets one free mulligan at the start of the game.
  • Players can bring their league decks and play games throughout the week in addition to getting together on Sunday afternoons for league day!

THE MANA DORK—The Planeswalker Deck Challenge

by February 11, 2017

 

Pro Tour Aether Revolt has just wrapped up, in which the heavily-favoured Saheeli Rai / Felidar Guardian “Copy Cat” infinite combo… was thoroughly run over by aggressive Vehicle decks.

Caught in the Brights

How could this happen? An infinite combo that wins on Turn 4 is the stuff of Modern. Not only that—Wizards missed this combo entirely during development of Aether Revolt, as Sam Stoddard admitted in a recent column. So you’d think Copy Cat is a sure bet, right?

Nope. 6 decks in the Top 8 were Vehicle decks, joined by an Energy deck and a Delirium deck. Copy Cat was nowhere to be found in the finals. People were able to prepare for a sorcery-speed combo that includes a Planeswalker who can be directly attacked, and Copy Cat’s results suffered accordingly.

It just goes to show—plan for the metagame, folks. Run disruption. Run answers for the decks you plan to face. Strong cards do not make a strong deck. You need a strong strategy first, composed of threats and answers that you’ve carefully chosen from across the 1,400+ cards currently legal in Standard.

So guess what I’m not doing for Aether Revolt Game Day this weekend?

Tezzeret, Master of Metal

THE CHALLENGE

For Aether Revolt Game Day, I’m going to buy one of the set’s Planeswalker Decks and compete with it.

I will use only the cards from the Planeswalker Deck and the two boosters it comes with. I’ll document any changes I make, as well as my match-ups and what happens in each game, to the best of my ability. I’ll then share it in the next edition of this column. The only element of mystery I’ll allow for now is whether I’m buying the Ajani deck or the Tezzeret deck.

Why?

I’m doing this because I want Magic to be better. Especially for new players.

Wind-Kin Raiders

I believe that while Planeswalker decks are exciting and cool, they can — and should — be more competitive out of the box.

Let’s look at the decks. The Tezzeret deck is built around the Improvise mechanic, and has you spamming out several cheap artifacts in order to bring down the cost of high-CMC finishers like Wind-Kin Raiders, Fen Hauler, and Barricade Breaker. The Ajani deck uses a low-to-the-ground aggressive strategy that features several Revolt cards and some synergies with +1/+1 counters to swarm down an opponent’s life total.

They have some exciting, unique cards and are very much capable of stealing games, but neither of them have much in common with decks from the Top 8 of the Pro Tour. You’re expected to do lots and lots of work on a Planeswalker Deck to make it viable for competitive Standard play.

Why does this have to be the case? 

Path to Exile

The Commander decks in recent years show that Wizards can make some truly excellent pre-constructed products. Not only that, but for many years, Wizards released Event Decks which could easily hold their own in competitive play, even if they weren’t Tier 1 strategies. They even built a Modern Event Deck, with staples like Path to Exile, Inquisition of Kozilek, and four copies of good lands like Isolated Chapel and Caves of Koilos.

Why are they not building introductory products like this for Standard, their flagship format?

I bought my fair share of pre-constructed decks when I was a young Magic player, and played my fair share of games—but if you had given me something with the power level of an Event Deck, even if I had had to save an extra week or two of my allowance for it, I would have been frothing at the mouth and begging all my friends to play.

I want every new player to have that feeling.

So between you and me, I think we can—and should—push for Planeswalker Decks to be much closer to Event Decks, and I plan on using my experience this weekend to show why.

THERE IS ALSO FREE GAME DAY THIS WEEKEND IF YOU PREFER A DIFFERENT KIND OF CARDBOARD

Magic isn’t the only thing happening at the store this weekend—make sure you come by and check out Free Game Day on Sunday at noon, where we’re opening up our demo library for anyone to come by and learn some new games! Admission is free and we’ll have store employees on hand if you have any questions, so come on down!

(And if you’re a Dicemasters person, fret not—the bi-weekly Dicemasters event is Saturday at 2 PM!)

See you at the store!

Jesse Mackenzie is a regular contributor to A Muse N Games and has a lot of experience being a new player. Tune in every two weeks for The Mana Dork, his column about all things Magic!

THE MANA DORK -In Defense of Magic’s Story

by January 24, 2017
 
Long, long ago, my father and I used to play Magic. He had a Blue-White fliers deck, and a classic Black discard deck with Dark Rituals, Hymns to Tourach, and Hypnotic Specters. I’d build whatever I could out of his leftover Green and Red cards, and we’d play each other.
Hypnotic Specter
(“Do you know why this Hypnotic Specter is strong?” “… You can cast it after Dark Ritual?” “Not just that — it takes cards from your opponent’s hand. It takes options away from them. They can’t counter your spells if you took the counterspell away.” “OH!”  — 9-year-old me, learning about the metagame clock and card advantage instead of, y’know, how to catch fish and fix things.)
I got so into the game that my dad picked up one of the earliest pieces of Magic lore ever published — Tapestries, a collection of short stories by leading fantasy authors of the time. It didn’t delve much into Urza, Mishra, and the Brothers’ War, but the authors did have an absolute field day with the idea that you spent the game summoning creatures and then just… leaving them there. The book was filled with classic fish-out-of-water stories and bildungsromans with a fantasy flair.
Tapestries gave me my first taste of lore — that intoxicating concoction that turns a collection of numbers and game mechanics into an elf. Into something I can care about.
I tore through the stories and chased them down with the flavour text on every card in our collection. I caught glimpses and facets of Urza and Mishra, like shards of light from a jewel’s reflection. I watched the Kjeldorans war against Lim-Dûl in the italicized text on every soldier I cast.
Kjeldoran Skyknight
When my father stopped buying cards, I took a break from the game as well, though not for long — I was back six years or so later, in time to see Kamahl’s story of rage, and then of redemption. Then came Mirrodin’s struggle against Memnarch, and Toshiro’s battle against Kondo and O-Kagachi, with Kamigawa’s war against itself in counterpoint.
Then another ten years gone, until Sarkhan traveled back in time to save Ugin, and I traveled to a brand-new games store on Portage Avenue to attend a draft and support a friend’s new business.
In all that time, the lore captivated me — though not so much how it was packaged in novels. I found actually playing the game preferable to slogging through 50,000 words of action I wasn’t taking part in, and kept up on the lore through research in my downtime.
So imagine my reaction when I returned, and discovered that Wizards was now publishing Magic’s story directly to the web in digestible little short stories and vignettes every single week. “Joy” understates it.
And then — and then — in 2015, we saw the Origins reboot, and each of our (now-)iconic Planeswalkers got origin stories and motivations. Again, that alchemical moment, when these powerful, modal enchantments became something with faces I could care about.
In 2016, the Gatewatch. A team of these icons, traveling planes and battling foes in a way Magic hadn’t seen since the days of the Weatherlight.
It was with the Gatewatch that I saw the criticism mount.
Imprisoned in the Moon
To hear some of the commentary online, you’d think the Gatewatch dooms us to years of plain, careworn comic-book super-feats and gosh-darn-it Boy Scout do-gooderism. Stories with no stakes and no growth — only cool explosions, cooler monsters, and pushed, tournament-level mythics with first names instead of descriptive ones. Woe, oh woe were the purists when Emrakul was revealed as the villain in Shadows block. Weep, oh weep did the devoted fans with every “Ashaya” and chess-playing Eldrazi Titan. The Internet rang with dismay.
Clearly, Wizards is just pandering. Or setting things up for the movie. Or sacrificing artistic merit for the sake of selling a product. Or giving in to the Tumblr crowd. Or something. Whatever explanation is popular this week. It changes depending on who you ask.
Yahenni's Expertise
If you cannot tell — personally, I think that thanks to the weekly-short-story model and the Gatewatch, Magic’s story is the best it’s ever been.
I know we’re all nostalgic about Urza and Mishra and Yawgmoth and the Weatherlight and Venser and Elspeth, and nostalgia is wonderful and all, but look: here and here are the two most recent stories by Chris L’Etoile, a writer from BioWare’s legendary stories that Wizards brought in specifically to work on Magic. And then there’s Alison Luhrs, showing off here and here and here and here and here, a Wizards employee with a background in playwriting who’s turning out some of the company’s finest work — especially with Yahenni, a Kaladesh character you have to meet.
Go on. Read them. It’s worth the time, trust me.
When you’re done, I want you to read this story and pretend that you know nothing else about Magic.
Yes, I just made you read about Jace. But look at that story again — if you take away all of Jace’s appearances in Alara and Zendikar and Return to Ravnica and all the core sets, if you just look at that story and the ones that came after it, Jace is a fascinating character.
Origins Jace is what happens when you take Memento, the Hunger Games, and every Cold War double-agent spy thriller and blend it all up. Out comes an exasperated nerd who could be the brainy sidekick on the radio in any action movie — except this is Magic, so this sidekick gets pushed to the forefront occasionally and told he has to save the day. Or at least not die while he comes up with a plan.
It’s a novel take. Maybe I’m benefiting from not having been around for seven or eight years of Jace in core sets, but I’m entertained, and I can’t wait to see what happens when he returns to Vryn.
And when it comes to the Gatewatch — ensemble-cast media spellbinds us, like it always does. Marvel has propelled itself to juggernaut status based on how skillfully it has used its ensemble casts, to give you an example, while DC tries and tries again. Frankly, you’re not going to break the surface these days if you don’t have a broad cast that people can connect with, and the Gatewatch is precisely that.
I now have characters with weekly adventures I can invest in, delivered in an accessible way, and I cannot tell you how happy I am. Sure, George R. R. Martin delivering 2,000 words of Innistrad intrigue would be great. But today, I will take Alison Luhrs telling stories of Orzhov machinations on Ravnica just as gladly.
Dark Intimations
Finally — finally — if nothing else I’ve said here compels you, consider this: Nicol Bolas, Magic’s greatest antagonist, is coming back in Amonkhet. Revelations are at hand. Years of lore will be connected in ways we don’t expect.
Don’t you want to see what happens next?
WHAT HAPPENS NEXT IS FREE GAMES DAY — AT THE STORE, AT LEAST
Sunday, January 29th is Free Games Day at A Muse N Games! Bring some friends and bring a game, or try one from the store’s extensive demo library! Staff will be on hand to help you if you have any rules questions, and there’s no charge to participate, so come on down!
On the Netrunner side of things, we’ve got the Netrunner Store Championships on Saturday January 28th. Bring your decks and a $15 entry fee and try to reveal — or hide — those corporate Agendas to win glory and fame (and some sweet prizes!).
Outside of that, there’s organized play every day — Modern on Monday, Standard on Tuesday, D&D, LCGs, and now Frontier on Wednesday, drafting (now with Aether Revolt!) and X-Wing on Thursdays, boardgame shenanigans, Sealed, and Commander (casual AND competitive!) on Fridays, more drafting on Saturdays, and D&D Expeditions on Sundays!
See you at the store!
Jesse Mackenzie is a regular contributor to A Muse N Games and completely unapologetic about how much he likes Jace and the Gatewatch. Tune in every two weeks for The Mana Dork, his column about all things Magic!

THE MANA DORK SPECIAL EDITION: THE GIFT DORK

by December 6, 2016
The Mana Dork
Are you looking for a gift for that special geeky someone, or family, in your life? Look no further.
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Hello, everyone! I hope your various holidays are going well for you, whichever you choose to celebrate. 😀
Usually, I write about Magic: the Gathering here on the site, but today, I figured I’d take a moment to help out anyone trying desperately to find a geeky gift within a particular price point. If you’re that person, welcome! I hope the following info is helpful.
We’re going to look at ten different gifts today — one for each price point from under $10 to above $100. Most of these are going to be board games, since they don’t need any extra accessories and they’re easy to wrap.
Ready? Let’s go!
* * *
1. ORNAMENTS FOR WINNIPEG HARVEST ($3)
 
Pictured above, these lovely dice ornaments are available from the store for $3 each. $1.50 from every ornament goes to help out Winnipeg Harvest, making them perfect for the socially-conscious gamer.
(Or, really, anybody who’s having some particularly bad rolls in their Dungeons & Dragons game and needs some new dice from off the tree!)
* * *
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2. CRAFTS FROM LOCAL ARTISTS ($10-$35)
 
A Muse N Games always has art from local artists on display, but they’ve got several items in especially for the Christmas season. Make sure you stop by and check out the dice bags, cards, coasters, and much, much more!
* * *
codenames
3. CODENAMES ($25), or CODENAMES PICTURES ($25)
 
Vlaada Chvátil is one of my favourite board game designers, and Codenames is perhaps his crowning achievement. I can’t recommend it enough.
In Codenames, you split into two teams, Red and Blue. There’s a grid of twenty-five different code words in front of you. Each team has to guess which code words belong to their team before the other team guesses all theirs. Each team has a Codemaster who can give clues — but the clues can only be a single word followed by a number. So if you’re on my team, and I need you to guess “Left”, “Neighbour”, and “Bible”, let’s say, I might give you the clue “Flanders 3” — and hope desperately that you’re a Simpsons fan!
I love Codenames because it can support groups of any size, the randomized code words make it infinitely replayable, and the clues often rely on shared experiences and references you might not remember, making every game different!
If you don’t have Codenames, you owe it to yourself to pick it up “for your significant other” (cough). If you or your giftee do have Codenames, you can pick up the recently-released Codenames Pictures, which replaces the code words with abstract images for an additional layer of difficulty!
* * *
04_fiasco
 
4. FIASCO ($35)
 
Fiasco is a role-playing game from Jason Morningstar designed to be played in about three or four hours. Unlike most role-playing games, you don’t need a Game Master to play!

In Fiasco, you give each player a set number of six-sided dice — some dark, some light. The players pick what “playset” they’re playing — whether it’s a shady casino heist, a Bond-movie caper, or a Coen Brothers-style crime gone wrong in small-town America — and who everyone’s character is. Over the course of the game, they’ll act out the scenes in-character, and award each other dark or light dice based on how well their characters performed.

(To see Fiasco in action, here and here are videos of Wil Wheaton and friends playing through a session of Fiasco on Tabletop!)

Hanging out and making your own movie is a great way to spend an afternoon, and if your giftee is on the creative side, Fiasco will probably go over quite well! Highly recommended.
* * *
05_flashpoint
 
5. FLASH POINT: FIRE RESCUE ($48)
 
Have you ever wondered why you always have to be playing against each other in board games? Are you tired of Monopoly disputes lasting much, much longer than the actual game? Flash Point: Fire Rescue to the rescue! (Pun intended.)
Flash Point is a co-operative game, where everyone plays as firefighters working to put out the blaze in a family home. Every turn, you have a set number of action points you can spend to move through the house, put out fires, or pull victims to safety. If you help 7 of 10 victims make it to the ambulance, you win!
The game also has an “expert” variant with a more challenging map, different roles for the firefighters, and rules for combustible materials and randomized set-ups. It’s great for families — easy to grasp for the kids, but still challenging for the adults as well!
Flash Point: Fire Rescue is one of my favourite co-operative games on the market, and if you’re looking for something the whole family can play, look no further
* * *
06_splendor
 
6. SPLENDOR ($50)
 
Codenames might be the most talked-about game among my friends in 2016, but Splendor is a close, close second.
In Splendor, you play as Renaissance merchants, buying and selling gems to increase your wealth and impress the local nobility. Turns play quickly, with each player choosing to do one of three things: collect gems, build a card, or reserve a card to build in the future. As you play through the game, your gems and cards you’ve built help expand your economic power, allowing for bigger and bigger turns and more and more chances to get prestige points from visiting nobles. 15 prestige points wins the game.
Splendor is one of the best games I know of for teaching the concept of building an engine: developing a strategy that will help you win the game, and then carrying through with it. If this sounds like it’s up your giftee’s alley, Splendor is sure to please!
* * *
07_takenoko
 
7. TAKENOKO ($60)
 
This is by far the most adorable board game I’ve ever played.
Takenoko revolves around the adventures of a ridiculously cute panda bear as it tries to eat all the bamboo in the Imperial Gardens, and an exasperated gardener who tries desperately to stop it from doing that. Your job is to manage the growth of the bamboo and the panda’s appetite, so that the bamboo patterns match special achievement cards in your hand. At the end of the game, the player with the most points from their achievement cards wins!

(The panda probably also wins, too — so much bamboo they get to eat!)

Takenoko is an accessible game that doesn’t overwhelm you with different mechanics and options. At the same time, the different choices you make throughout the game affect each other, and you have to do a good job of reading your opponents to make sure you complete your cards before they complete theirs.

If your giftee likes pandas, cuteness, and a surprising but not overwhelming amount of strategy, Takenoko is a fantastic choice! If your giftee doesn’t like pandas… I’m very, very sorry. I’m sure they’re nice people.

* * *
08_coup
 
8. ADD COUP TO ONE OF THE OTHER BOARDGAMES I’VE LISTED (+$20)
 
Alright, I’m cheating here by not actually giving you a $70 game, but Coup is so good! It’s up there with #10 on this list for one of my favourite games of all time.
In Coup, you’ve got two cards in front of you, face down. They represent important people you have influence over. You can claim to use the abilities of any card — but be careful! If people call you on it and you don’t have the card, you have to turn one of yours face-up and you’re halfway out of the game. But, if you do have the card, the person who called your bluff loses one and they’re halfway out! The last person standing wins.
Coup plays like poker with only fifteen cards and two-card hands. I love, love, love the interplay and bluffing and guessing in a game that has so few components. Best of all, the games are only about 15 minutes each, so you’re never out of the action for very long!

Buy Coup. Seriously. You won’t regret it.

* * *
09_fivetribes
9. FIVE TRIBES ($80)
The ancient game of mancala gets a number of surprising new twists!
In Five Tribes, the board consists of thirty small squares, each of which depicts an oasis, village, encampment, or desert, and each of which starts with a number of people on it. The people are Elders, Viziers, Builders, Merchants, and Assassins, and over the course of the game, you’ll be picking up and moving around these people to get different bonuses. Build towards purchasing the services of a powerful Djinn, or developing many of the squares, and you’ll be in a position to win!

Like Splendor, the gameplay of Five Tribes lends itself to building an engine: finding a strategy that isn’t immediately obvious, and taking advantage. The rules are quick and easy to grasp, but the complexity of the decisions you’ll have to make and the moves you can and can’t do help make Five Tribes a wonderful strategic brain-burner.

Five Tribes has taken mancala and made something fantastic and unique. If your giftee likes complex games that while away an afternoon, Five Tribes is going to go over very well.
* * *
10_scythe
 
10. SCYTHE ($110)
 
This is the big one. It’s also my favourite game of the year, and one of my favourites all-time.
Imagine it’s just after World War I or so, on an alternate Earth. The countries of Eastern Europe have developed steam-powered robots that help them farm, and fight. Now, you have to help a folk hero for your people claim territories and resources, and advance the cause of your nation, in the face of ever-increasing threats. This is the world of Scythe.
The designers at Stonemaier Games have created something that has the epic feel and scale of Risk, with wonderful art and storytelling, and layers upon layers of strategy and engine-building, in an extremely streamlined package. One of my favourite things about it is that you don’t have to get in fights to win — but you have to look like you can win them, which creates an amazing feeling of tension as you jockey for position on the board.
Scythe is not an easy game to grasp, but it is extremely rewarding. If your giftee is big into board games — the more strategic, the better — I can’t think of a better gift than Scythe.
 
* * *

stockingstufferpromotion

BUT THAT’S NOT ALL — GIFT-WRAPPING, STOCKING STUFFERS, AND MORE

 
I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that A Muse N Games has gift-wrapping available, for the price of a small donation to Winnipeg Harvest! All the easier to help make sure your gifts get home safely wrapped and covered, AND people in Winnipeg don’t go hungry over the holiday season.
As well, if you spend $200 or more at A Muse N Games, you’ll receive a FREE stocking-stuffer game to go along with all the wonderful gifts you’re already giving! Want to have a fun afternoon or evening playing all sorts of different games with friends and family? This is a great way to do it.

That’s it for me for now — hope I’ll see you at the store in the next few weeks!

Jesse Mackenzie is a regular contributor to A Muse N Games. Tune in every two weeks for The Mana Dork, his column on all things Magic.

Aether Revolt Prereleases January 14 & 15

by January 19, 2017

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We are excited to announce that we are now adding a 6pm SUNDAY prerelease!!
Below are the details of all our prereleases for this new set as well as links to event brite if you want to secure your spot without a trip down to the store.

 Aether revolt prereleases will start promptly with deck construction at the listed start times. Price is $35 taxes in if you register before 10pm Wednesday January 11, or if you register for multiple events at once  in store (midnight, noon, 5pm and introducing 6pm Sunday!) At the door for one event is $40 (or after 10pm on Wednesday January 11 until even starts).

Each participating player will receive a special prerelease pack containing 4 packs of Aether Revolt along with 2 Packs of Kaldesh.
Two Aether Revolt booster packs per player will be placed into the prize pool. Any player who plays through all four rounds of swiss receives an Aether Revolt booster pack from the prize pool.

Preview the Aether Revolt cards here:
http://magic.wizards.com/en/products/aether-revolt-cards

Register in store or online through Eventbrite:
Saturday January 14:
Midnight: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/aether-revolt-midnight-prerelease-tickets-29679110017
Noon: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/aether-revolt-noon-prerelease-tickets-29679160167
5pm: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/aether-revolt-5pm-prerelease-tickets-29679198281

Sunday January 15
Sunday 6pm: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/aether-revolt-sunday-6pm-prerelease-tickets-29679228371

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1783 Portage is NOW OPEN!!!

by November 5, 2016

Come visit us at our new location we’re still moving in over the weekend but it’s getting close 🙂 Please come and visit us and check out our new digs!

Thanks to everyone for your patience through this process and for all the help and love, it is truly appreciated.

Thanks,
Scotia and Brian